New Real Estate Agent Introduction Letter Tips

Whether you’re new to the real estate profession or just new to a particular real estate farming area, introducing yourself is a key element to generating leads and attracting new clients. Real estate agent introduction letters have been a staple of real estate marketing plans since time immemorial (well, maybe not THAT long), and will continue to be a valuable marketing tool for the foreseeable future.

If real estate agent introduction letters are such a great way to kick-start a real estate career, you might wonder, then why do they produce such inconsistent results — sometimes bringing in just a small trickle of inquiries and responses?

 Boosting Response to Your Agent Intro Letters

There are a variety of reasons that some direct mail campaigns are more successful than others:

  • A common barrier to a successful marketing letter campaign is the envelope. When some people in your farming area sort through their mail, every day, they may not even open a letter that looks like it might fall under the category of contain so-called “junk mail.” In many cases, it will go straight to the recycling pile. Thanks, in part, to all those unwanted credit card offers we’re all inundated with, people are becoming increasingly resistant to unsolicited offers and commercial messages of almost any kind. (Okay, maybe that was a little bit of an editorial comment, there!). But, the important thing to keep in mind is that there are ways to circumvent the problem. One way is to avoid using printed envelopes emblazoned with your real estate logo or even revealing the fact that the letter is coming from a real estate agent. Obviously, you’re going to make that perfectly clear in the introductory letter, itself, but you don’t necessarily want to give people the opportunity to prejudge the value of the letter and dismiss it before even opening the envelope. Other tactics for getting prospects to actually look at your introductory letter is to print, stamp, or write some sort of attention-catching blurb on the outside of the envelope (Actually, writing anything on hundreds of envelopes would probably induce a major case of “writers’ cramp!”) What you say on the outside of the envelope is only limited by your creativity and imagination, but it should either arouse curiosity, mention a free enclosure inside such as a calendar or packet of garden seeds, or make reference to updates or developments in the neighborhood or local real estate market. Enclosing a one-page real estate newsletter can also be a value-added approach to getting prospects to open your envelope. Developing an email list through your real estate website or blog is yet another way to potentially increase the “open rate” of your new agent introduction letter. When you switch to email marketing, though,  you’re faced with a new challenge: writing an attention-grabbing “subject line” that will entice people to click on and open your email message! The bottom line, however, is this: It’s all doable, and it only takes a few extra minutes to implement strategies that will get your real estate marketing letters read and responded to. (Note: These so-called obstacles are only small hurdles on your way to the “finish line.”)
  • Another possible reason for a marketing letter or new real estate agent announcement letter to get a low response rate is a lack of engagement. In other words, is your real estate introduction letter engaging your recipients by either asking a question, citing a relevant statistic, or making a thought-provoking statement that would draw people into your message?
  • Thirdly, all effective real estate agent introduction letters need to include more than one “call to action.” As you probably know, a call to action is a clear suggestion, request, or invitation to contact you  — to either make an appointment to discuss their real estate needs or to simply “pick your brain” about the local real estate market, the process of putting a house up for sale, or to find out what they need to do to prepare their house for sale. A “call for action” can also be an invitation to check out your latest listings on your website, Facebook page, or real estate blog. Another strategy is to offer prospects a free comparative market analysis. As I’ve mentioned in other blog posts, a great place to reiterate your call to action — especially if it’s a time-sensitive offer or invitation — is a “P.S.” at the end of your real estate introduction letter. Whether your prospects are reading your letter word-for-word or just scanning it, their eyes will typically be drawn to a P.S., because there’s the perception that it contains an important reminder or afterthought.

 

 

 

 

 

Marketing Letter Templates, Ideas, and Samples

If you’re at a loss of what to say in an introductory letter, you can download 12 variations of new agent introduction letters at this website*. The real estate marketing website also features a free sample of an expired listing prospecting letter. By the way, there are several elements of that sample letter that can be adopted for use in a neighborhood letter introducing you as a new real estate agent in your farming area. Visit the site* for an array of useful real estate agent marketing tools and prospecting letter templates for agents and Realtors. The marketing kit includes the following templates, marketing materials, and relationship-building content:

  • Introduction letters
  • New real estate agent announcement letters
  • Farm area prospecting letters
  • 22 different marketing letter templates for FSBO prospects
  • Real estate prospecting letter targeting renters
  • Short sale prospecting letters
  • Home staging letters
  • Referral letters
  • Real estate agent thank you letters
  • Buyer letters and seller letters
  • Networking letters to other real estate agents, Realtors, brokers, and other professionals

This extensive marketing kit of real estate letter templates and marketing strategies also includes a collection of 260 professionally written articles to catch the interest of homeowners in your farming area, other prospective clients, and your real estate newsletter subscribers. Get more information, here.


 

Thanks for checking out my latest thoughts on real estate marketing, direct mail strategies, email marketing, and — more specifically — ideas for improving the response rate of your new real estate agent introduction letters.

Stay tuned to this blog for more new real estate agent tips, marketing ideas, and prospecting strategies.

–Joel
Freelance writer, business blogger, marketing consultant
Email: prowriter30years@yahoo.com
Visit my website: Marketing Survival Kit

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Disclaimer: My real estate marketing blog posts often feature links to marketing templates, software, and/or digital products for which I am a compensated affiliate.

Strategies and Ideas for Real Estate Prospecting Letters

There are a lot of opportunities to use real estate prospecting letters to generate leads, inquiries, and new client relationships, but without a clear-cut list of options, it’s easy to overlook good ideas. Whether you’re sending prospecting letters to your email subscribers or your farming area, there are dozens of strategies for reaching out to clients and prospects. Her are a few marketing letter ideas to consider, as well as market segments to target:

  1. FSBO prospects
  2. Expired listing prospects
  3. New parents or parents-to-be who may be ready for more space
  4. Retirement age prospects looking to downsize
  5. Apartment dwellers who are receptive to the advantages of home ownership
  6. Prospective home sellers interested in learning about things like home staging, security tips for home sellers, and pricing options.

Another potentially productive way to use real estate marketing letters is to request referrals from professionals who are in a position to point business in your direction. A few examples of the many networking opportunities available to real estate agents include the following:

  • Apartment managers
  • Appraisers
  • CPAs
  • Financial planners
  • Insurance agents
  • Real estate attorneys
  • Former clients
  • Friends, acquaintances, family

Other Opportunities For Sending Prospecting Letters

Brainstorming about ways in which to use real estate prospecting letters can generate a lot of good ideas, as well as strategies for requesting referrals and potential target groups you might have overlooked. Here are a few additional ideas for lead generation, relationship building, and networking.

  1. Distributing open house announcements and flyers
  2. New agent introduction letters
  3. Announcing a new real estate office or changed contact information
  4. Holiday greetings or seasonal home maintenance tips
  5. Acknowledging clients and prospects on an individual basis to congratulate them on a new job, promotion, a new birth, engagement, birthday, anniversary, or other milestones. Keeping track of all these occasions requires you to be ultra-organized and alert, but it can be productive because people love to be acknowledged and recognized for their accomplishments, special occasions, and even losses.
  6. Compiling and distributing a quarterly newsletter (or having an assistant or freelancer handle it for you) can be a good way to stay in touch, cultivate “top of mind awareness” in your farming area, and build a reputation as a credible source of information about home ownership, the local real estate market, and the business side of real estate transactions.

The inspiration for this blog post was a website called My Marketing Letters*, which is filled with marketing ideas and features examples of real estate prospecting letters and an assortment of ideas for building professional relationships, generating real estate referrals, and staying in touch with potential clients in your real estate farming area.

Thanks for checking out my latest blog post on real estate marketing ideas, prospecting letters for real estate agents, and strategies for generating leads, inquiries, and real estate referrals.

Stay tuned for more prospecting ideas and marketing tactics.

–Joel
Real estate marketing blogger, freelance writer, journalist
email address: prowriter30years@yahoo.com

 

 

 

 

 

Disclaimer:  Many of my blog posts feature links to templates, digital products, and websites for which I am a compensated affiliate.